A Community Conversation on Equity in Precision Medicine
Making All of Us Work for All of Us
1:10 - 1:40 PM | Zinner Boardroom
1:40 - 2:10 PM | Collaboratory in Shapiro Lounge

This is a Post Event Networking Session

By studying each person’s genomic differences, researchers will be able to gain new and valuable insight as to how environment, biology, and behavior influence disease and resilience.

About The Roundtable

The goal of the All of Us Research Program is to create a research community of one million people or more who are willing to share their unique health data with researchers.

By studying each person’s genomic differences, researchers will be able to gain new and valuable insight as to how environment, biology, and behavior influence disease and resilience.

All of Us hopes to expand the current pool of contributors and recruit a more diverse population for these long-term studies in a way that no other program has before. By welcoming everybody, especially the historically underrepresented populations, this program aims to more accurately study human health and disease.

As in any large-scale, long-term study involving humans, there are significant challenges, such as the concern for patient privacy in the digital age, decade-long study retention, broad and deep community engagement, and the appropriate and timely return of research results to participants.

Come to this roundtable to engage in these types of hard-hitting questions and offer suggestions as to how they can be resolved. 

Chair

Elizabeth W. Karlson, MD, MMSc
Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School
Principal Investigator, All of Us Research Program

Discussants

Jonathan Jackson, PhD
Instructor in Neurology, Harvard Medical School
Center Director, CARE Research Center, Massachusetts General Hospital

Elizabeth W. Karlson, MD, MMSc
Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School
Principal Investigator, All of Us Research Program

Latrice Landry, PhD, MMSc
Fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Dana Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School

Biographies

Jonathan Jackson, PhD

Jonathan Jackson, PhD, is the founding director of the Community Access, Recruitment, and Engagement (CARE) Research Center at Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, which investigates the impact of diversity and inclusion on the quality of human subjects research and leverages deep community entrenchment to build trust and overcome barriers to clinical trial participation. His research focuses on midlife and late-life health disparities in clinical settings that affect Black populations. Dr. Jackson also works as a cognitive neuroscientist, investigating the early detection of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), particularly in the absence of overt memory problems. He serves on Massachusetts General Hospital’s Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center (ADRC) and MGH’s Cancer Center Equity Program, specializing in identifying and overcoming barriers to clinical research for people and communities of color. He has become a well-known MGH representative to communities of color and dozens of affiliated organizations, particularly regarding clinical research. Dr. Jackson serves on the leadership team of several organizations focused on community health, as well as local, statewide, and national advisory groups for research recruitment, Alzheimer’s disease, and community engagement.

Latrice Landry, MD, MMSc

Latrice has committed her career, which she began at Tufts University, to understanding the relationship between nature and nurture in health disparities and how health disparities research can be translated into clinical practice. She graduated from the Harvard Medical School Biomedical Informatics fellowship program in 2015. She was then selected as the inaugural Genomic Medicine and Health Disparities fellow at the FDA in collaboration with NHGRI. Her current work focuses on evaluating access, use and utility of genetic testing in diverse populations and improvements to genetic testing workflows to ensure equity of genetic tests.

Elizabeth Karlson, MD, MSc

Dr. Elizabeth Karlson is a Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School, and a rheumatologist and epidemiologist at Brigham and Women’s Hospital. She is co-Director of the Partners HealthCare Biobank, co-Principal Investigator of the New England Precision Medicine Consortium and co-Principal Investigator of the Harvard eMERGE Clinical Center. She serves as Director of the Rheumatic Disease Epidemiology Research Program for the Section of Clinical Sciences, Division of Rheumatology, Allergy, and Immunology, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women’s Hospital.

Dr. Karlson’s research interests are in rheumatic disease epidemiology and outcomes, genetics, gene-environment interactions, and bioinformatics analysis of electronic health records for clinical and translational research. She is funded by the National Institutes of Health for translational epidemiology, electronic health record and bioinformatics research studies as well as Human Biosample Research Cores. She is Co-Principal Investigator for the All of Us Research program. She serves as Co-Director for the Partners HealthCare Biobank that aims to collect samples, family history, lifestyle and environmental survey data linked with comprehensive health information from electronic health records from 100,000 Partners HealthCare patients and coordinates bioinformatics analyses for phenotype algorithms for the Biobank Portal and eMERGE network. She has served on grant review committees for the National Institutes of Health, Arthritis Foundation, and national grant agencies in Canada and Europe. She has served on the American College of Rheumatology Blue Ribbon Panel on Academic Rheumatology. She has received the Henry Kunkel Young Investigator Award and the Excellence in Investigative Mentoring Award from the American College of Rheumatology, and the Senior Faculty Mentoring Award from the Brigham and Women’s Hospital.