cancer in the crosshairs:
innovative testing and therapies
1:50 - 2:20 PM | Zinner Boardroom
2:20 - 2:50 PM | Collaboratory in Shapiro Lounge

This is a Post Event Networking Session

Experts in the field will share their thoughts in this session about bringing tools, including the immune system and the latest imaging technologies, to bear on the diagnosis as well as treatment of cancer.

About The Roundtable

Chances are, you know a cancer survivor, someone you know has cancer, or someone close to you is currently being screened for cancer. Although this is an unfortunate reality, researchers at Brigham and Women’s Hospital are broadly advancing cancer diagnoses in many ways. These developments improve the chances of early detection leading to better prognoses, and precision diagnostics allow cancer therapies to be tailored to individual patients. Experts in the field will share their thoughts in this session about bringing tools, including the immune system and the latest imaging technologies, to bear on the diagnosis as well as treatment of cancer.

Please join this roundtable to discuss diagnostic advances and innovations that are being applied right now in cancer as well as research methods being used to treat advanced cancers and how the best therapy can be selected for each patient.

Chairs

Jon C. Aster, MD, PhD
Professor of Pathology, Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Chief, Division of Hematopathology, Brigham and Women’s Hospital

Elizabeth Henske, MD
Director, BWH Center for LAM Research and Clinical Care
Brigham and Women’s Hospital

 

Discussants

Jon C. Aster, MD, PhD
Professor of Pathology, Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Chief, Division of Hematopathology, Brigham and Women’s Hospital

Elizabeth Henske, MD
Director, BWH Center for LAM Research and Clinical Care
Brigham and Women’s Hospital

Scott J. Rodig, MD, PhD
Associate Professor of Pathology, Harvard Medical School
Attending Physician, Hematopathology, Hematology Laboratory, and Molecular Diagnostic services
Director of the Tissue Biomarker Laboratory, Center for Immuno-Oncology

Clare Mary Tempany-Afdhal, MD
Ferenc Jolesz MD Professor of Radiology, Harvard Medical School
Vice-Chair, Radiology Research, Brigham and Women’s Hospital;
Director, National Center for Image Guided Therapy

David R. Walt, PhD
Hansjörg Wyss Professor of Biologically Inspired Engineering, Harvard Medical School, Professor of Pathology, Harvard Medical School, Department of Pathology, Harvard Medical School, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Core Faculty – Wyss Institute for Bioinspired Engineering at Harvard University

Biographies

Jon Aster, MD, PhD

Dr. Jon Aster is the Michael Gimbrone Professor of Pathology at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School and Director of Hematopathology at Brigham and Women’s Hospital. Jon obtained his MD/PhD in 1987 from the University of Michigan, and then did clinical training in Anatomic Pathology and Hematopathology at Brigham and Women’s Hospital. His postdoctoral work was conducted in the laboratory of Dr. Jeffrey Sklar at BWH.

Research in the Aster lab focuses on the role of Notch signaling in cancer and hematopoiesis. His lab has led or collaborated on work that has produced a number of firsts in the field, including production of the first mouse model of Notch-induced leukemia and detection and characterization of frequent Notch mutations in human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, an observation that lead to ongoing attempts to target Notch in cancers.

Scott Rodig, MD, PhD

Dr. Rodig is an anatomic and molecular pathologist at Brigham & Women’s Hospital, Director of the Hematopathology Fellowship at Brigham & Women’s Hospital, Director of the Tissue Biomarker Laboratory of the Center for Immuno-Oncology at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, and an Associate Professor of Pathology at Harvard Medical School. Dr. Rodig’s laboratory focuses on the development and application of novel tissue-based biomarker assays to improve the diagnosis of and to guide therapy for human cancer. Techniques his group employ include multiplex immunofluorescence staining coupled with digital image analysis, targeted genetic testing with customized fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) probes, and targeted gene expression profiling. His group has discovered and characterized disease mechanisms underlying Hodgkin lymphoma, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, specialized forms of lung cancer, and melanoma that have resulted in new diagnostic tests to direct clinical trial enrollment and personalized therapy.

David R. Walt, PhD

David R. Walt is the Hansjorg Wyss Professor of Bioinspired Engineering at Harvard Medical School and Professor of Pathology at Harvard Medical School and Brigham and Women’s Hospital, is a Core Faculty Member of the Wyss Institute at Harvard University and is a Howard Hughes Medical Institute Professor. Previously, he was University Professor at Tufts University. Dr. Walt is the Scientific Founder of Quanterix Corp and has co-founded several other life sciences startups including Illumina Inc., Ultivue, Inc. and Arbor Biotechnologies. He has received numerous national and international awards and honors for his fundamental and applied work in the field of optical microwell arrays and single molecules. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, the National Academy of Medicine, a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, a Fellow of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering, and a Fellow of the National Academy of Inventors. He has published over 300 papers and holds nearly 100 patents. He received a B.S. in chemistry from the University of Michigan and a Ph.D. in chemical biology from SUNY at Stony Brook, and did postdoctoral studies at MIT.

Elizabeth Henske, MD

Dr. Elizabeth (Lisa) Henske is best known for her groundbreaking discovery that mutations in the TSC2 gene cause the sporadic form of lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM).  This provided the foundation for pivotal clinical trials demonstrating the efficacy mammalian/mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors for the treatment of LAM.   Her laboratory has also discovered that autophagy plays a critical role in the pathogenesis and therapy of LAM, leading to an ongoing clinical trial called the “SAIL” trial:  Sirolimus and Autophagy Inhibition in LAM. She served as the 6th Director of the Brigham Research Institute, from 2016-2018.

Clare Tempany, MD

Dr. Clare Tempany is the Ferenc Jolesz MD Professor of Radiology at Harvard Medical School and Vice chair of Radiology research at Brigham & Women’s Hospital (BWH).  She is a native of Dublin, Ireland and a graduate of the Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland. She completed her internship and a senior house officer program in internal medicine in Dublin and Waterford prior to moving to Chicago for residency training in Diagnostic Radiology at Loyola University of Chicago. This was followed by fellowship and first faculty appointment in MRI at Johns Hopkins Medical institutions.

Over her 26-year career at BWH she established the body MRI program with a pioneering focus on Prostate MR. This prostate cancer program pioneered not only diagnostic imaging but image guided interventions in prostate cancer diagnosis and therapy. Under Ferenc’s mentorship and through a unique partnership with Anthony D’Amico MD (Rad Onc) established the first ever MR guided prostate cancer brachytherapy program.  She then, along with Noby Hata established the first MR guided transperineal, in bore prostate cancer biopsy program.  Now 20 years later both MR guided prostate cancer biopsy and MR guided Radiation therapy are rapidly becoming the standard of care to aid in prostate cancer diagnosis and cancer therapies in general.