Boning Up on the Connection Between
Muscle and Bone
3:40 - 4:10 PM | ZINNER BOARDROOM
4:10 - 4:40 PM | Collaboratory in Shapiro Lounge

This is a Post Event Networking Session

With more than 600 muscles and just over 200 bones in the human body, the communication that occurs between these two anatomical components continues to be a hot topic among clinicians and researchers.

About The Roundtable

With more than 600 muscles and just over 200 bones in the human body, the communication that occurs between these two anatomical components continues to be a hot topic among clinicians and researchers.

It will be particularly interesting to closely examine how they interact during the body’s bone healing process from the point of view of experts in trauma, plastic surgery, and heterocellular communication.

Through a collaborative approach from both clinical and basic scientists, the role of muscle in bone healing will be discussed. The conversation will cover heterocellular communication at the muscle bone interface and myocyte-derived factors that may bone healing.

Leaders in this field hope to bring communities together within this muscle-bone interface, in order to discuss and generate innovative research given the critical importance of muscles with regard to bone healing.  

Discussants

Julia Charles, MD, PhD
Clinical Rheumatologist, BWH
Instructor, Harvard Medical School

Ronald L. Neppl, PhD
Principal Investigator, Brigham and Women’s Hospital
Instructor of Orthopedic Surgery, Harvard Medical School

Indranil Sinha, MD
Assistant Professor, Harvard Medical School

Michael J. Weaver, MD
Chief, Division of Orthopaedic Trauma
Brigham and Women’s Hospital

Paul Yu, MD, PhD
Associate Physician, Brigham and Women’s Hospital
Associate Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School
@bmprii

Chairs

Julia Charles, MD, PhD
Clinical Rheumatologist, BWH
Instructor, Harvard Medical School

Ronald L. Neppl, PhD
Principal Investigator, Brigham and Women’s Hospital
Instructor of Orthopedic Surgery, Harvard Medical School

Biographies

Julia Charles, MD, PhD

Dr. Charles is a clinical rheumatologist with a research interest in bone physiology in the Division of Rheumatology, Immunology & Allergy in the Department of Medicine.

 

Indranil Sinha, MD

Indranil Sinha, MD, is a Plastic Surgeon at BWH. Sinha earned his undergraduate degree at the University of California, Berkeley and then completed medical school training at the University of Michigan, where he was inducted into the Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Society. Dr. Sinha completed his internship at BWH and went on to train in plastic surgery in the Harvard Plastic Surgery Training Program. Dr. Sinha’s research interests include skeletal muscle stem cells and their implications.  In particular, he is interested in how the skeletal muscle regenerative potential decreases with aging and how muscle stem cells can be used to treat volumetric loss.

Paul Yu, MD, PhD

Dr. Paul Yu is Associate Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School and Physician in Cardiovascular Medicine at Brigham and Women’s Hospital.  Dr. Yu completed his A.B. in Philosophy and a B.S. in Biological Sciences at Stanford University, M.D. and Ph.D. (Immunology) degrees at Duke University. He completed residency in Internal Medicine at the University of California at San Francisco, clinical and research fellowships in Cardiovascular Disease at Massachusetts General Hospital, and is board certified in Cardiovascular Medicine.   Dr. Yu’s laboratory studies the function of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling in development, and in vascular and musculoskeletal disease. The main focus of his laboratory’s work is to discern how BMP/TGF-β signaling achieves spatio-temporal and functional specificity, and modulates the tissue-specific consequences of inflammation and injury.

Ronald L. Neppl, PhD

Ronald L. Neppl, PhD, is a molecular Biophysicist with an interest in understanding the aging-associated cellular and molecular mechanisms that impair muscle function. He obtained both his B.S. and M.S. degrees in Biomedical Engineering from Marquette University, and his Ph.D. from the University of Virginia. After completing postdoctoral training at Boston Children’s Hospital and Boston University School of Medicine he joined the faculty in the Department of Orthopedic Surgery at Brigham and Women’s Hospital.

Michael J. Weaver, MD

Michael J. Weaver is the Chief of the Division of Orthopaedic Trauma at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and the Program Director for the Harvard Orthopaedic Trauma Fellowship. On a day-to-day basis, Dr. Weaver is responsible for the direction of the orthopaedic trauma service and the management of patients admitted through the emergency department with orthopaedic injuries. His esearch interests generally revolve around clinical outcomes research in the orthopaedic trauma patient population.   His two areas of primary interest are high-energy lower extremity injuries and geriatric fractures.