Magnet Matters®: Nursing Research

11AM – 12PM | Bornstein Amphitheatre

About the Session

 

What does it mean to achieve Magnet® Recognition, and why is this designation so critical to the future of the Brigham? This session will answer both of these questions and more, highlighting the Brigham’s journey toward Magnet® designation and how this recognition will benefit ongoing research and clinical care at the Brigham, specifically in the context of nursing science and innovation. The Magnet® Recognition Program designates exceptional health care organizations as “Magnet hospitals” based on multiple criteria that measure the strength and quality of the nursing care provided at the hospital.  Magnet hospitals are defined by a culture of excellence and innovation, which thrives throughout the entire institution and is recognized as a marker of excellence among health care organizations and hospitals. The discussion will include nurses who are involved in various research and innovation initiatives that exemplify Magnet® designation. The overall focus of the session is to educate the Brigham community as to what it means to be a Magnet hospital.

Speakers

MODERATOR:

  • Marcie Brostoff, MS, RN, NE-BC
    Associate Chief Nurse/Vice President, Clinical Education/Informatics/Practice/Quality Boston Children’s Hospital
    Topic: ‘The value of magnet and what it means to be a magnet hospital’

 

PANELISTS:

  • Stephanie Ahmed, DNP, FNP-BC
    Director, Ambulatory Nursing, Brigham and Women’s Hospital,
    Topic: ‘Caritas, Research and Innovation at Brigham and Women’s Hospital’

 

  • Sarah Collins, RN, PhD
    Nurse Scientist, Clinical Informatician, Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Partners HealthCare
    Topic: ‘MySafeCare’

 

  • Patricia Dykes PhD, RN, FAAN, FACMI
    Senior Nurse Scientist, Program Director for Research, Center for Patient Safety Research and Practice, Center for Nursing Excellence at Brigham and Women’s Hospital
    Topic: ‘Fall Prevention’

 

  • Katherine Gregory, RN, PhD
    Nurse Scientist; Director of Newborn Care Improvement and Analytics
    Topic: ‘Baby Microbiome’

 

  • Lichuan Ye, PhD, RN
    Associate Professor in Boston College William F. Connell School of Nursing.
    Topic: ‘Sleep Promotion’
ahmed

Stephanie Ahmed, DNP, FNP-BC,
Director, Ambulatory Nursing, Brigham and Women’s Hospital

Ahmed is the Director of Ambulatory Nursing at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and has a key role in leading the organization’s Ambulatory care redesign initiatives. Ahmed has held leadership roles with several professional societies; including Massachusetts Coalition of Nurse Practitioners (second term President, Legislative Committee Co-Chair). Serving as co-chair on the RWJ funded Massachusetts Action Coalition’s APRN Scope of Practice Committee; Ahmed led an assessment of the Massachusetts state environment of practice and served as editor and co-author of the committee’s report:  The Advanced Practice Nurse in Massachusetts.

Ahmed, was inducted to the National Academies of Science as a distinguished fellow. She is editor and contributing author for; DNP Education, Practice, and Policy:  Redesigning Advanced Practice Roles for the 21st Century.  She has published in peer-reviewed journals, served as faculty and lecturer in various Boston-based nursing programs and is an invited speaker and consultant both nationally and internationally.

Ahmed completed a course of study on Human Caring Theory through the Watson Caring Science Institute, in Boulder, Colorado.  Immersed in the work of internationally renowned nurse theorist, Jean Watson, Ahmed recognized Caritas is the antidote to the effects of health reform, humanizing the health care system and offering clinicians a framework upon which joy and resilience in practice can be promoted.

marcia

Marcie Brostoff, MS, RN, NE-BC,
Associate Chief Nurse/Vice President,
Clinical Education/Informatics/Practice/Quality Boston Children’s Hospital

Marcie Brostoff  is a visiting scholar for Boston College and the executive liaison to 31 schools of nursing throughout New England for BCH. For the past 25 years her career has been devoted to advancing nursing education Marcie developed and implemented a high-fidelity simulation program for new graduate pediatric nurses.  This nationally recognized program has prepared 400 new graduate nurses over 6 years. She co-authored a successfully awarded proposal to secure funding for a Nursing Career Lattice Program. This program is an innovative approach to increase the racial and ethnic diversity of the nursing workforce at Boston Children’s Hospital. In her current role, Marcie provides strategic and operational nursing leadership in the selection, development, deployment, re-engineering, and evaluation of technology, education, quality  and professional development of clinical staff.

sarah

Sarah Collins, RN, PhD,
Nurse Scientist, Clinical Informatician, Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Partners HealthCare

Sarah Collins, RN, PhD is a Senior Clinical and Nurse Informatician in Clinical Informatics Partners eCare at Partners Healthcare Systems and an Instructor in Medicine at Harvard Medical School and Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Department of Medicine Division of Internal Medicine and Primary Care.  Her research, as well as her applied clinical informatics work, is focused on modeling, developing, and evaluating standards-based, patient-centered collaborative informatics tools to further patient safety, knowledge development, clinical decision-support, and coordinated patient-centered care. Dr. Collins is an experienced critical care nurse and holds a PhD in Nursing Informatics from Columbia University School of Nursing.  She was a National Library of Medicine Post-Doctoral Research Fellow at Columbia University’s Department of Biomedical Informatics.  She received her Bachelor of Science in Nursing from the University of Pennsylvania, where she minored in Health Care Management.  Dr. Collins was selected as one of two national Emerging Leaders by the Alliance for Nursing Informatics in 2012 and her research has been recognized and awarded by the American Medical Informatics Association and the 11th International Congress on Nursing Informatics.

dykes

Patricia Dykes PhD, RN, FAAN, FACMI,
Senior Nurse Scientist, Program Director for Research, Center for Patient Safety Research and Practice,
Center for Nursing Excellence at Brigham and Women’s Hospital

Patricia Dykes is Senior Nurse Scientist and Program Director for Research in the Center for Patient Safety Research and Practice and the Center for Nursing Excellence at Brigham and Women’s Hospital. and Assistant Professor at Harvard Medical School. She has a program of informatics and patient safety research that explores integration of decision support into clinical workflows for use by care team members(including patients). Dykes was the principal investigator of the Fall TIPS (Translating Interventions for Patient Safety) that identified the linkage between nursing fall risk assessment and interventions to prevent falls in acute care hospitals. Dykes is the author of 2 books, over 80 peer reviewed publications and has presented her work related to fall prevention, patient safety, nursing informatics and clinical documentation both nationally and internationally. She is an elected fellow of the American Academy of Nursing and the American College of Medical Informatics.

gregory

Katherine Gregory, RN, PhD
Nurse Scientist; Director of Newborn Care Improvement and Analytics

Dr. Katherine Gregory, PhD, RN is a nurse scientist and research faculty in the Departments of Newborn Medicine and Nursing at Brigham and Women’s Hospital.  The focus of Dr. Gregory’s research is on the human microbiome, specifically the intestinal microbiome of the preterm infant.  Dr. Gregory and her colleagues have investigated the role that the intestinal microbiome plays in necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), a catastrophic inflammatory bowel disease that is a major contributor to neonatal morbidity and morbidity. In addition, she has explored the influence of clinical factors such as gestational age, mode of birth, antibiotics, and nutrition on acquisition of intestinal microbiome following preterm birth.  Dr. Gregory has also investigated the usefulness of urinary proteins and inflammatory cytokines as early biomarkers of NEC in a population of preterm infants.  In this work, Dr. Gregory and her colleagues identified a measure of gut injury that was found to be a useful predictor of NEC as early as seven days prior to the onset of disease.  Dr. Gregory is Chair of the multidisciplinary Clinical Practice Council within the Department of Newborn Medicine. This council is responsible for developing and implementing clinical practice guidelines, ensuring that care provided to infants in all settings of the hospital is uniformly excellent and evidence based. Dr. Gregory is also an Editor of Journal of Perinatal and Neonatal Nursing.

ye

Lichuan Ye, PhD, RN,
Associate Professor in Boston College William F. Connell School of Nursing.

Dr. Ye’s research focuses on promoting health through better sleep and better management of sleep disorders. In particular, her work aims to improve understanding of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) clinical presentations to facilitate earlier diagnosis, to improve OSA health outcomes by promoting treatment adherence, and to improve sleep in acute care hospital and on college campus. Dr. Ye received her B.S.N. in Nursing and Master’s degree in Geriatrics and Internal Medicine from West China School of Medicine Sichuan University in China, and her Ph.D. in nursing from the University of Pennsylvania. She is a member of the Sleep Research Society, American Academy of Sleep Medicine, and Sigma Theta Tau Honor Society of Nursing.