Opioid and Pain Innovations at Brigham Health

4:00 - 5:00 PM
Extensive work is being done around the Brigham to address the opioid epidemic and safely treat patients experiencing pain. Learn about novel hospital-wide interventions, improving care of hospitalized patients with opioid use disorder, better ways to treat pain, and our impressive program to treat newborns born to mothers who use opioids in this dynamic and multi-disciplinary panel discussion.

ABOUT THE SESSION

The opioid overdose epidemic continues, causing over 2,000 lives lost in Massachusetts just in the past year. However, the  epidemic is changing. Whereas the initial rise in deaths was associated with increased prescribing of opioids, it now appears  that street drugs like illicit fentanyl are associated with the majority of opioid-related deaths. This session will highlight innovative programs around the hospital dealing with opioids and pain management in the setting of the modern opioid epidemic. Dr. Weiner will open the session and discuss the current status of the opioid epidemic in Massachusetts and work happening in the BWH Program for Opioid and Pain Innovation. Dr. Suzuki will discuss his work researching novel ways to ensure hospitalized patients with substance use disorders are linked to and retained in treatment, including working with recovery coaches as well as offering outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy for those who require long-term antibiotics for serious infections. Ms. Stabile will discuss a program in obstetrics improving the care of newborns with neonatal withdrawal syndrome and their mothers. Finally, Dr. Schreiber, an expert in pain management, will discuss her work investigating how people process pain differently, and her studies using systematic measurement of differences in pain processing to guide more rational and personalized pain prevention, and elucidate better alternatives to opioids for pain treatment.

CHAIR / PANELIST

Scott Weiner, MD, MPH

Director, Brigham Comprehensive Opioid Response and Education (B-CORE) Program, Department of Emergency Medicine, Brigham and Women’s Hospital

 

PANELISTS

Barbara B. Stabile, BWN MSN

Obstetric Professional Development Manager, Center for Nursing Excellence (CNE), Brigham and Women’s Hospital

Kristin Schreiber, MD, PhD

Attending Anesthesiologist, Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine, Brigham and Women’s Hospital
Assistant Professor, Harvard Medical School

Joji Suzuki, MD

Director, Division of Addiction Psychiatry, Department of Psychiatry, Division of Addiction Psychiatry, Brigham and Women’s Hospital

SPEAKERS

Barbara B. Stabile, BWN MSN

Obstetric Professional Development Manager, Center for Nursing Excellence (CNE), Brigham and Women’s Hospital

Barb Stabile has a long history of working with women in their reproductive years, both as a direct caregiver and a manager and leader. She joined BWH in 2018 in the newly developed PDM role and covers the antepartum, intrapartum and Mother baby units collaboratively with 2 other PDM’s, Wendy Moan and Mimi Pomerleau.

Joji Suzuki, MD

Director, Division of Addiction Psychiatry, Department of Psychiatry, Division of Addiction Psychiatry, Brigham and Women’s Hospital

Dr Suzuki is the Director of the Division of Addiction Psychiatry and Director of Addictions Education in the Department of Psychiatry, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, and an Assistant Professor of Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School (HMS). Dr Suzuki is a consultation-liaison psychiatrist in the Division of Medical Psychiatry at Brigham and Women’s Hospital. His research is focused on integrating evidence-based addiction treatment initiated in general medical settings, and has received funding from NIH, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, and Harvard Medical School. He was recently awarded a NIDA K23 Career Development Award to receive mentored training in conducting clinical trials, and to study the impact of recovery coaches on buprenorphine treatment. He currently serves on a variety of committees, workgroups, and taskforces for Partners HealthCare, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts Hospital Association, and the State of Massachusetts to address the opioid epidemic. He has published over 50 peer-reviewed manuscripts and book chapters as first or co-author.

Kristin Schreiber, MD, PhD

Attending Anesthesiologist, Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine, Brigham and Women’s Hospital Assistant Professor, Harvard Medical School

Dr. Schreiber is investigating the development of chronic pain after surgical injury. She is particularly interested in the mechanisms by which individual differences in psychosocial processing and nociceptive sensitivity lead to differential risk of chronic pain amongst individuals. Dr. Schreiber’s current research uses the accurate measurement of psychosocial and psychophysical phenotype in preoperative patients to prospectively identify individuals at highest risk of pain persistence, so that the processes underlying this propensity may be averted. Other collaborative projects investigate how pain may be modulated by non-opioid analgesic techniques (regional anesthesia, yoga-based exercise, distraction, music, CBT, and open-label placebo).

Scott Weiner, MD, MPH

Director, Brigham Comprehensive Opioid Response and Education (B-CORE) Program, Department of Emergency Medicine, Brigham and Women’s Hospital

Dr. Weiner is an Associate Professor of Emergency Medicine at Harvard Medical School and the Director of the Division of Health Policy and Public Health in the Department of Emergency Medicine at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston.  He is also the Director of B-CORE: The Brigham Comprehensive Opioid Response and Education Program, a hospital-wide, multi-disciplinary project with the goal of reducing opioid-related morbidity and mortality. His research focuses on technological innovations that improve the care of ED patients presenting with opioid use disorder and with pain, including usage and optimization of online prescription drug monitoring programs (PDMPs), as well as improving access to naloxone, the life-saving opioid overdose reversal medication.