Women Are Not Men
Why Sex Matters
4:20 - 4:50 PM | ZINNER BOARDROOM
4:50 - 5:05 PM | Collaboratory in Shapiro Lounge

This is a Post Event Networking Session

The Connors – BRI Center for Research on Women’s Health and Gender Biology focuses on life-stages specific to women that explain sex differences in morbidity, mortality, and certain disorders.

About The Roundtable

Women are not men. A statement so simple, yet brimming with all the complexities that coincide with gender and sex differences. It is critical to acknowledge and consider these variables when studying disease and overall human health.

The Connors – BRI Center for Research on Women’s Health and Gender Biology focuses on life-stages specific to women that explain sex differences in morbidity, mortality, and certain disorders. Menopause is one hormonal change that women go through that can greatly affect their risk of diseases such as ovarian cancer, breast cancer, and cardiovascular disease.

Those who attend this panel will not only gain a better understanding of the diseases women are at risk for across the life-span, but also the many resources available that are tailored specifically to women. It will be an informative and empowering dialogue, validating the need to study and treat disease through sex-gender informed research and medicine.  

CHAIRS / Discussants

Hadine Joffe, MD, MSc
Executive Director, Mary Horrigan Connors Center for Women’s Health and Gender Biology
Paula A. Johnson Associate Professor of Psychiatry in the Field of Women’s Health, Harvard Medical School
Vice Chair for Psychiatry Research, Department of Psychiatry
Brigham & Women’s Hospital

Ursula Kaiser, MD
Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School
Chief, Division of Endocrinology, Brigham & Women’s Hospital

Kathryn M. Rexrode, MD, MPH
Chief, Division of Women’s Health, Department of Medicine, BWH
Faculty Director, Office for Women’s Careers, Center for Diversity and Inclusion, BWH
Associate Professor of Medicine, HMS
Associate Physician, Division of General medicine, Department of Medicine, BWH
Associate Physician, Division of Preventive Medicine, Department of Medicine, BWH
Brigham & Women’s Hospital

Biographies

Hadine Joffe, MD, MSc

Hadine Joffe, MD, MSc, is the Executive Director of the Mary Horrigan Connors Center for Women’s Health and Gender Biology at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Vice Chair for Research in the Brigham and Women’s Hospital Department of Psychiatry, and the Paula A. Johnson Associate Professor of Psychiatry in the Field of Women’s Health at Harvard Medical School. As director of the Women’s Hormone and Aging Research Program at Harvard Medical School, Dr. Joffe is an experienced clinician and clinical translational researcher in field of women’s aging and mental health. She has received continuous funding from the NIH for the past 18 years to study the mechanisms, course, and treatment of menopausal symptoms of hot flashes, sleep disturbance, depression, and fatigue in healthy midlife women and breast cancer survivors. Current R01 funding from the NIA is supporting an investigation of the impact of sleep fragmentation and other menopause-related factors on body fat gain in midlife women using an experimental paradigm.

As the Director of the Connors Center, Dr. Joffe is launching a series of cross-cutting research initiatives that engage researchers from multiple disciplines across the academic community as well as external partners in industry, regulatory, and advocacy communities.  Under her leadership, the goals of the Connors Center are to ignite change in women’s health and gender biology by 1) catalyzing new research to address gaps in our knowledge, 2) bolstering knowledge by improving dissemination of research findings, and 3) transforming medical education by establishing a robust sex/gender-informed curriculum for medical students and trainees and by supporting research fellowships. The Connors Center’s primary effort is to advance the investigation of novel therapeutics for conditions affecting both women and men, to conduct systems-focused investigations, and to expand disease-based research for conditions that are exclusive, predominate, or differential in women.

Ursula Kaiser, MD

Dr. Kaiser Is Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School, Chief of the Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Hypertension at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, and Co-Director of the Brigham Research Institute. She has an active research program focused on the genetic and molecular mechanisms underlying the neuroendocrine regulation of reproductive development and function. Dr. Kaiser’s research has received continuous NIH support for more than twenty years.  She is the Principal Investigator of several NIH R01 grants, the Program Director of the NIH-funded Building Interdisciplinary Research Careers in Women’s Health (BIRCWH) program to train junior faculty in women’s health research, and the Principal Investigator of an NIH training grant to train physicians and scientists in academic endocrinology.

Dr. Kaiser is also an active clinician, focusing on neuroendocrinology and reproductive endocrinology. Dr. Kaiser is a member of the American Society of Clinical Investigation and the Association of American Physicians, a Fellow of the American College of Physicians, and the recipient of the Ernst Oppenheimer Award of the Endocrine Society and the A. Clifford Barger Excellence in Mentoring Award at Harvard Medical School. She is a past Vice-President of the Endocrine Society.

Kathryn M. Rexrode, MD, MPH

Dr. Kathryn Rexrode is the Chief of the Division of Women’s Health in the Department of Medicine at Brigham and Women’s Hospital. She is an Associate Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School and the Director for the Office for Women’s Careers in the Center for Faculty Development and Diversity at Brigham and Women’s Hospital. She also sees patients in Gretchen and Edward Fish Center for Women’s Health as a primary care physician. Since joining the faculty at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in 1996, Dr. Rexrode has had leadership positions in research, education and faculty development.

Dr. Rexrode graduated AOA with a medical degree from Case Western Reserve School of Medicine and came to the Brigham in 1991 for her primary care internal medicine residency. After residency, she stayed at Brigham and Women’s Hospital to complete an epidemiology research fellowship and a Masters of Public Health at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health in 1996.

Dr. Rexrode is a leader in faculty development in her role as Director for the office of Women’s Careers in the Center for Faculty Development and Diversity where she works to support women’s careers and their academic advancement, to address issues of diversity and inclusion, and to reduce the impact of unconscious bias.  She has led 3 cohorts of the Women’s Leadership Program for women junior faculty, and has lectured widely on leadership skills for women as well as the role of unconscious bias.